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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Diseases » Diabetes and Eyesight » Causes of Diabetic Retinopathy

Causes of Diabetic Retinopathy

What are the causes of diabetic retinopathy and long-term diabetes? Changes in blood-sugar levels is the main culprit. People suffering from diabetes generally develop diabetic retinopathy after at least ten years of having the disease. Once you are diagnosed with diabetes, it is essential to have an eye exam once a year or more.

In the early stage of diabetic retinopathy, called background or non-proliferative retinopathy, high blood sugar in the retina damages blood vessels, which bleed or leak fluid. This leaking or bleeding causes swelling in the retina, which forms deposits.

In the later stage of diabetic retinopathy, called proliferative retinopathy, new blood vessels begin to grow on the retinal. These new blood vessels may break, causing bleeding into the vitreous, which is the clear gelatinous matter that fills the inside of the eye. This breakage can cause serious vision difficulties. This form of diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness, and is therefore the more serious form of the disease.

It is not hard to greatly reduce your risk of diabetic retinopathy by following some simple steps and being aware of your overall health. The most important factor you can control is maintaining your blood sugar at a healthy level. Eating a healthy diet will help greatly in controlling blood sugar levels. A regular exercise regimen is also a great help. Finally, make sure to listen to your doctor’s instructions.

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To our dear patients:

We are happy to announce we have reopened and we are making special arrangements to be mindful of social distancing and your personal comfort. We are taking extra precautionary action for your protection and safety. We carefully sanitize all surfaces, including equipment, frames and supplies.

Additionally, when coming in for an examination, here are a few things that you can expect:

The office door will remain locked throughout office hours in order to control the patient flow and establish social distancing in the office. Patients are screened upon entering for high-risk history, symptoms and their temperatures taken.Patients (in addition to all staff) are required to wear a mask or face covering for the entirety of the visit.Patients are required to come inside alone (unless they are a minor in which case only one guardian may accompany them).

Patients may still order glasses or contacts for curbside pickup or have them shipped directly.

We thank you for your patience and look forward to serving you at our office again soon!